Digital Humanities and Craft

I’ve been fascinated by the recent debates centering on the nature of digital humanities. While the debate has gone on for years, the most recent round of posts (some of which are summarized by Geoffrey Rockwell here) were spurred by an MLA panel on the history and future of digital humanities. One of the most…

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Friday Varia and Quick Hits

The first part of this week was well and truly summertime and the second half has been spring. The good news is that we finally received some soaking rain turning my neighborhood from a kid of pickley brown to a vibrant green. In fact, it’s damp enough that we’re under something (and I kind you…

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Music Monday: Some Sun Ra Notes

This weekend, I started to think just a bit more seriously about writing something on Sun Ra and the relationship between his work (both in music and writing) and Orientalism. I’ve toyed with some ideas related to this topic a few months ago, and you can read some of them here. I’m not entirely sure…

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Byzantine Landscapes

I read with great excitement Fotini Kondyli and Sarah Craft’s article in the most recent Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology. It’s titled “The Making of a Byzantine Monastic Landscape: A Case Study from the Mazi Plain in Northwest Attica, Greece,” and in an honest-to-goodness article on the archaeology of Byzantine landscapes in Greece. This is exciting for any…

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More Archaeology and Space

One of the really neat things about writing the archaeology of the contemporary world is that the field is relatively new. As a result, there are new ideas, approaches, and projects emerging constantly that add to substantively to how we think about both the emerging field and the “recent past.”  This week, I’ve been looking through…

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Genealogy of Mediterranean Survey Archaeology

An article by Michael Loy has been making the rounds lately, and my colleague Grace Erny brought it to my attention this morning. It so happens that I’ve also been talking a lot of Greek survey (and Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey) with my old friend David Pettegrew lately because he is working on a book…

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Teaching Tuesday: Teaching and The COVIDs

This has been a weird semester. I am teaching a new introductory level class (World Civilization I), we’re dealing with room capacity rules that have significantly changed how I planned to teach that class, and I’m teaching a couple of overloads that are being run exclusively via email. The threat of a shortened semester or…

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