Summer Reading List

It’s almost summer and my stack of books and stalled projects has grown to the point of being embarrassing. But each summer brings a bit of hope with, maybe, a bit more time and a bit more clarity of purpose, or at very least some long flights and hazy jet-lagged nights where reading can happen. To add a…

Read More →

Late Antique and Byzantine Anatolia

Last week I worked my way through John Haldon, Hugh Elton, James Newhard, Archaeology and Urban Settlement in Late Roman and Byzantine Anatolia: Euchaïta-Avkat-Beyözü and its Environment (Cambridge 2018) in preparation for my annual trek to the Eastern Mediterranean for field work. As the major field seasons for the survey phase of the Western Argolid Regional Project have concluded, we have…

Read More →

Friday Varia and Quick Hits

It’s springtime here in North Dakotaland, except for the blizzard and the sub-freezing temperatures. Ignore that.  It’s a Formula 1 weekend, the Cup cars are in Richmond, baseball season and the IPL are underway, Lomachenko is fighting and the NBA playoffs start this weekend. So maybe this isn’t the worst weekend to be snowed inside.  If that’s still not enough…

Read More →

Slow Archaeology and Privilege

This weekend, during a useful conversation about slow data and slow archaeology, Shawn Graham tweeted that he felt that slow data still evoked privilege and that “to be slow depends on a whole bunch of people hustling as fast as they can.” Shawn’s a smart and thoughtful guy, and this conversation about speed in archaeology…

Read More →

Five Notes on Classics

The past couple of months have been pretty intense for my colleagues in Classics. The field is undergoing a very public debate over its future and its values. The willingness of some of my colleagues (in the broadest sense), to speak out in favor of more inclusive, more expansive, and more critical futures for Classics is…

Read More →

Risk, Failure, and Privilege

A recent tweet and ensuing conversation got me to thinking about the relationship between risk (and failure) and privilege. The tweeter stated that “failure is privilege” and a colleague of mine, Shawn Graham, retweeted this sentiment in the context of a book project that he’s working on that explores the role of failure in his career. The…

Read More →

Punk Archaeology, Slow Archaeology, and the Archaeology of Care: Prepublication Draft

Readers of my blog know that I’ve been struggling with an article that comes from a paper that I delivered at this fall’s European Association of Archaeologists annual meeting. The paper brings together a number of different strands of thinking and the broader concept of transhumanism to speak to the potential implications of a digital…

Read More →

Analog Monsters in a Digital Age

Over the weekend, I finally finished Elizabeth Freeman’s Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories (Duke 2010). The book has had a significant impact on my thinking about time in an archaeological context and the potential for an archaeology that is contemporary offering new opportunities for an affective archaeology. Oddly enough, her work also pushed me…

Read More →

Three Thing Wednesday

It the time of the week (and frankly, semester) where the best I can do is muster three quick thoughts for the ole bloggeroo. 1. Inspiration. In my historical methods class yesterday, we read Michelet and discussed historical writing that sought to convey the emotional power to inspire readers and create the powerful emotional bonds that…

Read More →

Contemporaneity and Colonialism, Eurocentrism, and Historical Archaeology

This weekend, I got my very first paper copy of the European Journal of Archaeology. I felt very international!  The EJA is one of those journals where I always find at least one article that intrigues me. The most recent issue had an article titled “Modern Colonialism, Eurocentrism and Historical Archaeology: Some Engendered Thoughts” by Sandra Montón-Subías and Almudena…

Read More →