Changing Landscapes of Rural Cyprus

I was pretty interested to read the latest article by the Athienou Archaeological Project team in the most recent issue of Journal of Field Archaeology: Shedding Light on the Cypriot Rural Landscape: Athienou Archaeological Project in the Malloura Valley, Cyprus 2011-2013. The article documents the most recent few years of excavation at the rural sanctuary of Athienou-Mallora which is just to the north of our coastal site of Pyla-Koutsopetria in southeastern Cyprus.

The article focused on the dynamic nature of rural sites and contribute yet more evidence that challenges the view of rural life in the Mediterranean as backward and  somehow less prone to change than life in urban centers. The sanctuary of Athienou-Malloura clearly underwent a number of significant changes over its long history and there was ample evidence for the reuse of even prestigious objects (like monumental and life-size sculpture) in renovations throughout its active history. Of particular interest was the presence of lamps with Christian symbols dating to Late Antiquity along with lamps with less overtly religious symbolism. This hints that the sanctuary might have been the site of some kind of syncretic religious practices at the end of its long life. We still do not know much about the afterlife of “pagan” sanctuaries on Cyprus especially when compared to the considerable scholarly attention paid to the late life of sanctuaries and temples in Greece. 

The article also features a brief report on the resurvey of several sites documented in the Malloura Valley Survey in the early 1990s. Returning to these sites nearly 20 years after their initial survey confirmed once again the dynamic character of the Cypriot countryside. While the results of this work were rather less surprising with mechanized agriculture and modern building practices intensifying the neglect witnessed by abandoned rural structures and sites, it was nevertheless revealing how little remained visible at abandoned mud brick buildings. In one case the entire building had vanished; in another, the mud brick walls had collapsed into the stone soccle at such an accelerated pace that human interference was suspected. 

The only bummer about the article is that I received an offprint from a colleague which was great, but I the offprint does not provide access to the supplementary material which requires a Manley log in to see. While the information on these pages is – presumably – supplementary and not vital to understanding the content of the article, it is nevertheless a bummer that I can’t see it. It is one more example of how we no long own content in a true sense, but simply rent access. As I work with some of the same authors on this article to develop a paper+digital+web edited volume based on papers from the Mobilizing the Past conference held this spring, I’m going to have to think hard about how to ensure persistent access to our supplementary material on the web.http://uwm.edu/mobilizing-the-past/

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